Scientiae 2017: Call for Papers

EXTENDED DEADLINE: 15 January 2017 – Accepted speakers will be notified on 22 January 

Proposals are invited for the sixth annual Scientiae conference on disciplines of knowing in the early modern world (roughly 1400-1800), which will take place at the University of Padua, 19-22 April 2017. Our Keynote Speakers will be Paula Findlen (Stanford), Claire Preston (QM London), and Antonio Clericuzio (Roma Tre).

The major premise of this conference series is that knowledge during this period was inherently interdisciplinary, involving complex mixtures of theories, practices and objects, which had yet to be separated into their modern ‘scientific’ configurations. Although centred on attempts to understand and control the natural world, Scientiae addresses natural philosophy, natural history, and the scientiae mixtae within a wide range of related fields, including but not restricted to Biblical exegesis, medicine, artisan practice and theory, logic, humanism, alchemy, magic, witchcraft, demonology, divinatory practices, astronomy, astrology, music, antiquarianism, experimentation and commerce.

This year attention is especially given to the history of early modern knowledge and erudition, the history of universities, particularly though not exclusively the history of the university of Padua, as well as the history of the book and the history of political thought. 

In addition to individual papers, we seek panel proposals about, though not exclusively:

  • Teaching with Collections
  • The Enlightenment
  • The Republic of Letters
  • Early Modern Universities and Amateur Knowledge
  • Venice-Vienna-Costantinople-Moscow: The Other Early Modern Europe

Please email your 250-word abstract, together with a one-page CV to scientiaepadua [at] gmail.com.

The deadline for abstract submission is 15 January 2017. We shall be notifying the selection outcome by 22 January. 

 

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New Publication: Special Issue of Nuncius

Nuncius 31: Aspects of the Production and Circulation of Early Modern Scientiae: Religion, Natural Philosophy, Secrecy, and Openness

Edited by Vittoria Feola

A special issue of Nuncius, comprised of papers from Scientiae 2014 edited by Vittoria Feola, is now available. The issue, entitled ‘Aspects of the Production and Circulation of Early Modern Scientiae: Religion, Natural Philosophy, Secrecy, and Openness’, includes papers by Stefano Gulizia (CUNY), Sylvie Nevin (Liege), Cornelis J. Schilt (Oxford), Ricarda Suitner (Erfurt), Charles van der Heuvel (Huygens) et al., and Vittoria Feola (Padova, Oxford). As Vittoria writes: ‘This special issue of Nuncius presents six case studies that shed light on aspects of the production and circulation of early modern scientiae. They are the mature reflections stemming from papers which the authors presented at the international conference “Scientiae. Disciplines of Knowing in the Early Modern World,” which was held in Vienna in 2014. As we declare on our home page, Scientiae is “The international research group for intellectual history, 1400–1800. Knowledge in this period (scientia) entailed knowledges (scientiae). Cognitive practices and objects we now take to be discrete – from theology to astronomy, philology to chemistry, tradecraft to law – were, instead, inter-involved. Fascinating in themselves, the period’s intellectual flows also contrast productively with modern systems and hierarchies.”

For more info, please see the Nuncius website.

 

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Final Reminder: Scientiae Oxford 2016

Final Reminder: Oxford 2016 Proposals Due 15 November

The deadline for proposals for the fifth annual Scientiae conference (Oxford, 5-7 July 2016) on disciplines of knowing in the early modern world (roughly 1400-1800) is 15 November 2015. The major premise of this conference series is that knowledge during this period was inherently interdisciplinary, involving complex mixtures of theories, practices and objects, which had yet to be separated into their modern ‘scientific’ configurations. Although centred on attempts to understand and control the natural world, Scientiae addresses natural philosophy, natural history, and the scientiae mixtae within a wide range of related fields, including but not restricted to Biblical exegesis, medicine, artisan practice and theory, logic, humanism, alchemy, magic, witchcraft, demonology, divinatory practices, astronomy, astrology, music, antiquarianism, experimentation and commerce. Attention is also given to mapping intellectual geographies through the tools of the digital humanities.

For more information and to submit, please click here.

 

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Scientiae 2015: Abstracts now Available

Scientiae 2015: Abstracts now Available

Abstracts for all sessions and roundtables at Scientiae 2015 are now available here. Individual abstracts can be viewed or downloaded by clicking on the links below each session, and will be accessible during the conference through the free wifi facilities provided. In addition, the penultimate programme is now available for Scientiae 2015. Please note that it is no longer possible to request changes. The final programme will be available a few days before the conference.

For more information, see the conference webpage.

 

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Making Knowledge Visible: An Exhibition of Rare Books from the CRRS Collection

The Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies is pleased to present an exhibition of rare books in honour of Scientiae 2015:

Making Knowledge Visible
An Exhibition of Rare Books from the CRRS Collection

May 27 – June 10. Entrance Foyer, E. J. Pratt Library

This exhibition will showcase a selection of rare books in the CRRS collections that reveal the many and varied ways early modern thinkers investigated, understood, and depicted the world. Inspired by Scientiae’s mandate, our selections cut across disciplinary boundaries and include works of cosmology, astronomy, and astrology; geometry, architecture, and technology; alchemy, medicine, and natural history. Curated by John Christopoulos, CRRS Fellow.

 

For further details, please see the Scientiae 2015 webpage.

 

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Scientiae 2015: Final Registration Reminder

Final Registration Reminder and Final Preliminary Programme

Please note that registration closes on 8 May, and that it will not be possible to register at the doorClick here to register for Scientiae 2015. The registration fee is $225.00 CAD, or $115.00 CAD for students. The registration fee includes tea/coffee breaks, a reception on Wednesday evening, and a delegate package. It is an additional $35.00 CAD to attend the conference banquet on Thursday night. Please be aware that if you fail to register by 8 May, the conference committee will have to remove your paper from the programme. If you encounter any difficulties with registration, please contact James A. T. Lancaster now, and not after this date.

The final revised preliminary programme for Scientiae 2015 is now available online. Please note that changes will not be possible after 8 May. The final programme will be available one week before the commencement of the conference.

For more information, please see the conference webpage.

 

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Scientiae 2015: Registration Reminder and Revised Programme

Registration Reminder and Revised Programme

Please note that registration closes on 8 May, and that it will not be possible to register at the doorClick here to register for Scientiae 2015.* The registration fee is $225.00 CAD, or $115.00 CAD for students. The registration fee includes tea/coffee breaks, a reception on Wednesday evening, and a delegate package. It is an additional $35.00 CAD to attend the conference banquet on Thursday night. Please note that the registration fee is the same for everyone, regardless of whether or not you are giving a paper.

* Please also be aware that all registration fees are non-refundable.

revised preliminary programme for Scientiae 2015 is now available online. Please note that the programme will be updated regularly, and that we will continue to take note of all your scheduling requests. The final programme will be available one week before the commencement of the conference. Please contact me before 8 May should you have any scheduling concerns.

For more information, please see the conference webpage.

 

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Scientiae 2015: Registration Now Open

Registration for Scientiae 2015 is Now Open

Please click here to register for Scientiae 2015.* The registration fee is $225.00 CAD, or $115.00 CAD for students. The registration fee includes tea/coffee breaks, a reception on Wednesday evening, and a delegate package. It is an additional $35.00 CAD to attend the conference banquet on Thursday night. Please note that the registration fee is the same for everyone, regardless of whether or not you are giving a paper. Registration closes on 8 May 2015.

*By clicking on the link above you will be redirected to a secure registration form hosted by UofTtix, the University of Toronto’s Central Box Office. Please note that you should ignore the option to have your confirmation mailed to you. Please also be aware that all registration fees are non-refundable.

For more information, please see the conference webpage.

 

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CFP Final Reminder: Scientiae 2015

The CFP deadline for Scientiae 2015 (University of Toronto, 27-29 May) is 17 November 2014. Paper, panel, and round-table proposals are invited for the fourth annual international conference on the emergent knowledge practices of the early-modern period (1450-1750). The major premise of this conference is that knowledge during the period of the Scientific Revolution was inherently interdisciplinary, involving complex mixtures of practices and objects which had yet to be separated into their modern “scientific” hierarchies. Our approach, therefore, needs to be equally wide-ranging, involving Biblical exegesis, art theory, logic, and literary humanism; as well as natural philosophy, alchemy, occult practices, and trade knowledge. Attention is also given to mapping intellectual geographies through the tools of the digital humanities. Always, our focus must be on the subject-matter at hand, rather than on the disciplinary performances by which we access it. Although centred around the emergence of modern natural science, Scientiae is intended for scholars working in any area of early-modern intellectual culture.

Abstracts for individual papers of 20 minutes should be between 250 and 350 words in length. For panel sessions of 1 hour and 30 minutes, a list of speakers and chair (with affiliations), a 500-word panel abstract, and individual abstracts from each speaker are required. Newly at Scientiae 2015, we also invite proposals for a limited number of topic-based roundtable sessions. These should feature brief presentations from 2 or 3 knowledgeable speakers on a defined but broad issue in early-modern intellectual history, with the intention of opening up multilateral discussion from the floor—the main business of the session.

We are also pleased to announce that Mario Biagioli (UC Davis), Stephen Clucas (Birkbeck), Peter Dear (Cornell), Anthony Grafton (Princeton), and Jonathan Sawday (SLU) have joined the Advisory Board of the Scientiae conferences.

All submissions should be made using the online form here.

 

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CFP Reminder: Scientiae 2015

Ship_smallThe CFP for Scientiae 2015 (University of Toronto, 27-29 May) is now available online. Paper, panel, and round-table proposals are invited for the fourth annual international conference on the emergent knowledge practices of the early-modern period (1450-1750). The major premise of this conference is that knowledge during the period of the Scientific Revolution was inherently interdisciplinary, involving complex mixtures of practices and objects which had yet to be separated into their modern “scientific” hierarchies. Our approach, therefore, needs to be equally wide-ranging, involving Biblical exegesis, art theory, logic, and literary humanism; as well as natural philosophy, alchemy, occult practices, and trade knowledge. Attention is also given to mapping intellectual geographies through the tools of the digital humanities. Always, our focus must be on the subject-matter at hand, rather than on the disciplinary performances by which we access it. Although centred around the emergence of modern natural science, Scientiae is intended for scholars working in any area of early-modern intellectual culture.

Abstracts for individual papers of 20 minutes should be between 250 and 350 words in length. For panel sessions of 1 hour and 30 minutes, a list of speakers and chair (with affiliations), a 500-word panel abstract, and individual abstracts from each speaker are required. Newly at Scientiae 2015, we also invite proposals for a limited number of topic-based roundtable sessions. These should feature brief presentations from 2 or 3 knowledgeable speakers on a defined but broad issue in early-modern intellectual history, with the intention of opening up multilateral discussion from the floor—the main business of the session.

All submissions should be made using the online form here.

 

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  • Scientiae 2017: Padua

    Scientiae 2017: Padua

    The Call for Papers for Scientiae 2017 is now available online.